News & Articles

 

http://www.mainlinetoday.com/Main-Line-Today/April-2012/Q-A-Up-From-Corinth-Author-J-Arthur-Moore/index.php?cparticle=1&siarticle=0#artanc

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http://www.antiquesandauctionnews.net/Article+Display/Book+Follows+A+Boy%60s+Search+For+His+Father+During+The+Civil+War/  


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http://www.tricountyrecord.com/article/20120605/NEWS01/120609984/students-experience-lesson-on-civil-war-children&pager=full_story


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Students Learn About “Boys’ War”

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A social studies teacher at Pequea Valley Intermediate School introduced his students to the study of the Civil War through the experiences of boys their own age who fought in the war.

Ned Beck, who teaches eighth grade, enlisted the help of author and retired teacher J. Arthur Moore, who himself had taught about “The Boys’ War” and whose granddaughter is a student of Beck’s. Moore, in turn, contacted Boy Scouts of America Venture Crew 1861, a Civil War Fife and Drum Corps chartered in Gettysburg, to make the project a living history experience. The lessons took place on May 4 and 7.

Friday's classes began with a slide show of 72 images of real boys who were part of the war, including their photographs, battlefield sketches, artists’ representations and images of markers, monuments and books in commemoration of their lives. During the Civil War, more than 250,000 boys age 17 and under participated in the ranks of both Union and Confederate armies, and an additional number participated in their navies. Some researchers put the number closer to a million.

Most of the boys survived. Most were teenagers, but some were much younger. Some became famous, and some were recognized with the Medal of Honor. And some weren't boys at all. There was the story of 10-year-old Tom Hunley, who was really Anna. Her father led a unit and had no one with whom to leave her, so he cut her hair and took her with him. She never shared her story until she was in her 60s.

Prior to the class, the students had read an excerpt from the book “The Boys' War: Confederate and Union Soldiers Talk About the Civil War” by Jim Murphy, developed from the boys’ journals and letters. They had also read the stories of boys from material developed for a website marking the Pennsylvania 150th commemoration of the Civil War (www.pacivilwar150.com). From these readings, each student developed a profile in a format provided by Beck. Then each developed his or her own profile as though they had lived 150 years ago.

Also, a battle sequence, described in “Boys' War,” was shown in the form of a three-minute clip from the movie “Gods and Generals.” That was followed by a look at the kinds of ammunition used in guns and cannons.

In addition to the telling of individual boys’ stories, the manner in which the research was done was also shared. Several books were on display, including original resources, researched materials and historic fiction.

Monday's class was a scripted experience, through which the students enlisted as a new Pennsylvania regiment formed on May 7, 1862, in response to President Abraham Lincoln's call for 300,000 new Union troops. The students reported to camp just outside the building on the lawn near their classroom. Both teachers, Beck and Moore, who retired from Penn Treaty Middle School in Philadelphia, wore Civil War-period civilian clothing.

The camp was established by Michael Nedrow, associate adviser for Venture Crew 1861, and his sons, Ryan, a fifer, and Austin, a drummer, who portrayed musicians from the 1st Pennsylvania Reserve Corps Volunteers (PRVC) assigned to help the new Company train its own fifer and drummer. Each boy told his own story regarding how he came to join the 1st PRVC in 1861. The elder Nedrow portrayed Cpl. Nethrow, preparing new recruits for their captain's arrival. After questions from the students, which were part of the script, Nethrow took the new recruits aside to drill them and prepare them for the captain's review.

The students signed and returned enlistment contracts in exchange for Springfield rifles (made from wood). A fifer and a drummer were taken from student volunteers, dressed in uniforms, and sent off with the musicians to be taught how to play for the Grand Review. The rifle company was drilled in basic rifle maneuvers, and noncommissioned officers were promoted. The students were taught how to march in column formation, and the review was performed on the school lawn. Principal Taylor Croft also enlisted in one of the companies.

Having completed training, the troops were marched to the parade area, where the musicians were assembled. There, the four musicians led the company in the review. The musicians were thanked for their service, and all were mustered out to gather for some closing information shared by Nedrow.

http://www.engleonline.com/AdDesk/Htmlfiles/Readers/article.epc?id=68941

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